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Old December 28, 2011, 14:35   #1
treyak
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Maker's ID for Receiver, Argentine

I was lucky enough to buy a stripped Argentine receiver back in the early 90's when they were brought in for a short time. I was trying to figure out who made it and a model number for my personal files. There are barely any markings on the receiver except:
1. Made in Argentina
2. Imp. S.A.C. Latta
3. the serial number

The markings except for the serial number are not too deep, and seem to be placed on the receiver more like an after thought. The serial number is normal and placed squarely on the side.

I bought it for $330.00 back in the day.

Any help would be appreciated.
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Old December 28, 2011, 14:40   #2
FALonious
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The Argentine Armed Forces officially adopted the FN FAL in 1955, but the first FN made examples did not arrive in Argentina until the autumn of 1958. Subsequently, in 1960, licensed production of FALs began and continued until the mid-to-late 1990s, when production ceased. In 2010, a project to modernize the totality of the existing FAL and to produce an unknown number of them was approved. This project was called FAL M5.

Argentine FALs were produced by the government-owned arsenal FM (Fabricaciones Militares) at the Fábrica Militar de Armas Portátiles "Domingo Matheu" (FMAP "DM") in Fray Luis Beltrán, located a few miles north of Rosario. The acronym "FAL" was kept, its translation being "Fusil Automático Liviano", (Light Automatic Rifle). Production weapons included "Standard" and "Para" (folding buttstock) versions. Military rifles were produced with the full auto fire option. The rifles were usually known as the FM FAL, for the "Fabricaciones Militares" brand name (FN and FM have a long standing licensing and manufacturing agreement). A heavy barrel version, known as the FAP (Fusil Automático Pesado, or heavy automatic rifle) was also produced for the armed forces, to be used as a squad automatic weapon. The Argentine 'heavy barrel' FAL, also used by several other nations, was found to frequently experience a failure to feed after firing two rounds from a full magazine when in automatic mode.

A version of the FALMP III chambered in the 5.56x45mm NATO cartridge was developed in the early 1980s. It used M16 type magazines but one version called the FALMP III 5.56mm Type 2 used Steyr AUG magazines. The FARA 83 (Fusil Automático República Argentina) was to replace the Argentine military's FAL rifles. The design borrowed features from the FAL such as the gas system and folding stock. It seems to have been also influenced to some degree by other rifles (the Beretta AR70/223, M16, and the Galil). An estimated quantity of between 2,500 and 3,000 examples were produced for field testing, but military spending cuts killed the project in the mid 1980s.


Argentine Soldiers in the Falklands War.There was also a semi-automatic–only version, the FSL, intended for the civilian market. Legislation changes in 1995 (namely, the enactment of Presidential Decree Nº 64/95) imposed a de facto ban on "semi-automatic assault weapons". Today, it can take up to two years to obtain a permit for the ownership of an FSL. The FSL was offered with full or folding stocks, plastic furniture and orthoptic sights.

Argentine FALs saw action during the Falklands War (Falklands-Malvinas/South Atlantic War), and in different peace-keeping operations such as in Cyprus and the former Yugoslavia. Rosario-made FALs are known to have been exported to Bolivia (in 1971), Colombia, Croatia (during the wars in former Yugoslavia during the 1990s), Honduras, Nigeria (this is unconfirmed, most Nigerian FALs are from FN in Belgium or are British-made L1A1s), Peru, and Uruguay (which reportedly took delivery of some Brazilian IMBEL-made FALs as well). Deactivated ex-Argentinean FALs from the many thousands captured during the Falklands War are used by UK forces as part of the soldier's load on some training courses run over public land in the UK.

The Argentine Marine Corps, a branch of the Argentine Navy, has replaced the FN/FM FAL in front line units, adopting the U.S. M16A2. The Argentine Army has expressed its desire to acquire at least 1,500 new rifles chambered for the 5.56x45mm NATO SS109/U.S. M855 (.223 Remington) cartridge, to be used primarily by its peacekeeping troops on overseas deployments.

The US Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) secretly purchased several thousand Argentine FAL rifles in 1981, which were supplied to the Nicaraguan Contras rebel group. These rifles have since appeared throughout Central America in use with other organizations.

These rifles are currently being modernized to a new standard, the FAL M5 (or FAL V), which uses polymer parts to reduce weight, and has Picatinny rails and optic mounts for carrying accessories.

Go here http://www.falfiles.com/forums/showt...39#post3261239
and see if your # matches any of the others....the rest of your FAL may be there.
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Old December 28, 2011, 14:45   #3
DakTo
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You should also see: F.S.L. cal 7.62 x 51 mm (L.S.R. .308 WIN) on the left side and FMAP "DM" Rosario on the right side.

There is no model number. DSA purchase $300 back in the early 1990s.
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Old December 28, 2011, 16:18   #4
FSL
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Quote:
Originally posted by FALonious
The Argentine Armed Forces officially adopted the FN FAL in 1955, but the first FN made examples did not arrive in Argentina until the autumn of 1958. Subsequently, in 1960, licensed production of FALs began and continued until the mid-to-late 1990s, when production ceased. In 2010, a project to modernize the totality of the existing FAL and to produce an unknown number of them was approved. This project was called FAL M5.

Argentine FALs were produced by the government-owned arsenal FM (Fabricaciones Militares) at the Fábrica Militar de Armas Portátiles "Domingo Matheu" (FMAP "DM") in Fray Luis Beltrán, located a few miles north of Rosario. The acronym "FAL" was kept, its translation being "Fusil Automático Liviano", (Light Automatic Rifle). Production weapons included "Standard" and "Para" (folding buttstock) versions. Military rifles were produced with the full auto fire option. The rifles were usually known as the FM FAL, for the "Fabricaciones Militares" brand name (FN and FM have a long standing licensing and manufacturing agreement). A heavy barrel version, known as the FAP (Fusil Automático Pesado, or heavy automatic rifle) was also produced for the armed forces, to be used as a squad automatic weapon. The Argentine 'heavy barrel' FAL, also used by several other nations, was found to frequently experience a failure to feed after firing two rounds from a full magazine when in automatic mode.

A version of the FALMP III chambered in the 5.56x45mm NATO cartridge was developed in the early 1980s. It used M16 type magazines but one version called the FALMP III 5.56mm Type 2 used Steyr AUG magazines. The FARA 83 (Fusil Automático República Argentina) was to replace the Argentine military's FAL rifles. The design borrowed features from the FAL such as the gas system and folding stock. It seems to have been also influenced to some degree by other rifles (the Beretta AR70/223, M16, and the Galil). An estimated quantity of between 2,500 and 3,000 examples were produced for field testing, but military spending cuts killed the project in the mid 1980s.


Argentine Soldiers in the Falklands War.There was also a semi-automatic–only version, the FSL, intended for the civilian market. Legislation changes in 1995 (namely, the enactment of Presidential Decree Nº 64/95) imposed a de facto ban on "semi-automatic assault weapons". Today, it can take up to two years to obtain a permit for the ownership of an FSL. The FSL was offered with full or folding stocks, plastic furniture and orthoptic sights.

Argentine FALs saw action during the Falklands War (Falklands-Malvinas/South Atlantic War), and in different peace-keeping operations such as in Cyprus and the former Yugoslavia. Rosario-made FALs are known to have been exported to Bolivia (in 1971), Colombia, Croatia (during the wars in former Yugoslavia during the 1990s), Honduras, Nigeria (this is unconfirmed, most Nigerian FALs are from FN in Belgium or are British-made L1A1s), Peru, and Uruguay (which reportedly took delivery of some Brazilian IMBEL-made FALs as well). Deactivated ex-Argentinean FALs from the many thousands captured during the Falklands War are used by UK forces as part of the soldier's load on some training courses run over public land in the UK.

The Argentine Marine Corps, a branch of the Argentine Navy, has replaced the FN/FM FAL in front line units, adopting the U.S. M16A2. The Argentine Army has expressed its desire to acquire at least 1,500 new rifles chambered for the 5.56x45mm NATO SS109/U.S. M855 (.223 Remington) cartridge, to be used primarily by its peacekeeping troops on overseas deployments.

The US Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) secretly purchased several thousand Argentine FAL rifles in 1981, which were supplied to the Nicaraguan Contras rebel group. These rifles have since appeared throughout Central America in use with other organizations.

These rifles are currently being modernized to a new standard, the FAL M5 (or FAL V), which uses polymer parts to reduce weight, and has Picatinny rails and optic mounts for carrying accessories.

Go here http://www.falfiles.com/forums/showt...39#post3261239
and see if your # matches any of the others....the rest of your FAL may be there.
Dear FALonious, your resume on the argentine FAL´s is very accurate, just two corrections, only 56 specimens of the the FAA81/FARA83 Cal. 5,56 x 45 were made in the FMAP DM among 2.5 million ctges. (M193) in the FM FLB, the project was canceled because budget cuts in the argentine army.
The so called FAL 5 or FAL V is just a desire of many members of the armed forces, the DGFM have not the machinery, or the budget to do such modification, the FM FLB where the new firearms plant was relocated, only produce pistols and rimfire carbines.
FSL (Collectors of Arms and Ammunitions Argentine Association member)
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Old December 28, 2011, 21:04   #5
gmtech485
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treyak

I have the exact same receiver.
My research has shown that it is a forged Rosario manufactured receiver even though there are NO FMAP or Rosario markings on it .

There should be a thread here somewhere from a year or so ago with pictures and input from others on my receiver.

Try searching my posts.

Can you tell us where and when you bought yours?

I picked mine up holding an L1A1 kit together.

It is now holding a pristine Sarco Argy kit together.
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Old December 28, 2011, 21:26   #6
treyak
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Thanks for the responses and information. There are no more marking on the receiver, does anyone know who the manufacurer would be? FM I guess would be the only manufacturer down there that would have been making them. When the receiver was advertised, it was listed as a "Hybrid" that would accept both inch and metric. I had it built on an early L1A1 kit and it turned out great, except for the correct features, but it was awesome to myself at 21. I am now planning to built it onto a Sarco Argie kit and am looking forward to it.
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Old December 28, 2011, 21:30   #7
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It is an F.M.A.P. receiver, Just not marked that way.

Mine has all metric features and the notch in the pivot pin lug for the Argy lower receiver.

Good luck with your Argy build.
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Old December 28, 2011, 21:34   #8
treyak
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Your reply came in while I was writing mine. I purchased it in late 1993 from an add in Shotgun News and shipped to a local shop. My buddy was in gunsmithing school at the time, and with some advice and access to the shop tools, it and two other builds came together. All the parts fit just fine, but the charging handle slide had to be thinned down to fit into the channel. I am glad that my friend knew that you modify the cheap part and not the expensive one to make something work.
Thanks for the input.
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